Loma Linda University Medical Center - Radiology Residency

Radiology residency program

LLUMCPhilosophy and goals

Among the many investments made by the Department of Radiology at Loma Linda University Medical Center--in modern technology, medical expertise, and highly skilled technologists -- the most important investments are those we place in people: the individuals we serve and who serve with us. Through them, we invest in the future.

The department's primary concern is for the quality of care we provide our patients. The sections within the department of radiology are uniquely dedicated to this goal; each is staffed by fully certified physicians, specialists, and subspecialists, as well as by physicists, technologists, and support personnel. Both our diagnostic imaging and interventional radiology staff make patient care their highest priority. We also place high priority on training excellent radiologists, which includes participation in original scholarly activities.

The department of radiology offers a structured, broad-based residency training program in diagnostic radiology. Over 270,000 radiologic examinations a year are performed. The radiology group is exceptionally cohesive and enjoys excellent relationships with referring specialty practice groups within the University. Residents are exposed to the academic and clinical practice of radiology, with the ultimate goal being the successful completion of boards and subsequent escellence in the practice of radiology, whether in the private or the academic setting.

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 Participating hospitals

Loma Linda University Medical Center is the hub of a worldwide network of 600 hospitals and health care institutions operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The facility has a 797-bed capacity, providing care for over 33,000 patients annually. This includes the adjacent Children's Hospital. These complement a faculty outpatient practice, which schedules more than 650,000 outpatient appointments annually. The Medical Center's 11 floors accommodate modern facilities which offer more than 300 distinct medical services. The Medical Center also houses research laboratories, outpatient clinics, class and conference rooms, amphitheaters, and a comprehensive medical library.

Loma Linda University Medical Center is the only regional level-1 trauma center and the only university medical center serving four California counties -- roughly 25% of California. Dual heliports for air ambulances enable the Medical Center to provide rapid aid to patients needing tertiary care from remote areas. Patients are served in nine intensive care units, which include surgery, neurosurgery, thoracic care, cardiac care, respiratory care, neonatal care, pediatric care, pediatric cardiothoracic surgery, and trauma care. The 72-bed neonatal intensive care unit is one of the largest in the United States.

A world-renowned infant heart transplantation team, the osteoporosis research laboratory, and the Children's Hospital have often brought Loma Linda University Medical Center to the public's attention. With the construction of the unique, hospital-based proton accelerator, Loma Linda University Medical Center has also become an international focal point for cancer treatment and research. The proton accelerator project brings a tremendous influx of oncologic diagnostic imaging to the Department of Radiology.

The Medical Center is the major teaching hospital for the 600 medical students enrolled at Loma Linda University School of Medicine.

Jerry L. Pettis Memorial Veteran's Medical Center is a 110-bed facility and is located less than one mile from Loma Linda University Medical Center. It is among the most modern of health care facilities in the Veterans Administration. To fulfill its threefold mission of patient care, research, and teaching, the Veterans Medical Center has been equipped with modern diagnostic and support equipment. Medical research programs have been allocated over 40,000 square feet of space, and an active affiliation is maintained with the Loma Linda University medical and dental schools.


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Curriculum

Radiology residents spend 40 of their 48 months at various subspecialty rotations at Loma Linda University Medical Center or the adjacent Loma Linda University Children's Hospital. Four months will be spent at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, three months at the large faculty outpatient clinic, and one month at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, D.C.

 While on rotations, residents are responsible for initially viewing examinations and formulating impressions. As residents progress, they rotate through the more specialized services, such as interventional radiology and neuroradiology. Here, residents work up patients, observe, and become progressively more involved as they obtain exposure, experience, and increasing competence. All procedures are done with direct attending staff supervision, with the goal of the resident eventually performing the procedure with staff supervision, but without staff intervention, in all but the most complicated cases.

 The department supports a dedicated and well-stocked radiology library which is continuously and systematically updated. There is a Radiology Learning Center, expressly designed for supplemental resident teaching. In addition to the American College of Radiology learning files, this center provides residents with access to computers having interactive teaching CDs, laser video discs, and videotapes covering all aspects of radiology. Fiberoptic Internet access is also provided.

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 Fellowships

Fellowships offered at LLUMC

 Fellowships recently obtained by LLUMC residents:

  • Cross-sectional imaging
    University of California, San Francisco 1996-1997
    University of Florida, Gainsville 1997-1998
    Harbor UCLA 2000-2001
    University of California, San Francisco 2000-2001
    Duke University 2001-2002
    University of California, San Francisco 2001-2002
    Brigham & Women's 2002-2003
    University of California, San Francisco 2002-2003
    University of California, Los Angeles 2002-2003
    University of California, San Francisco 2003-2004
    University of California, San Francisco 2003-2004
    Beth-Israel Deaconess (Harvard) 2003-2004
    Johns Hopkins 2004-2005
    University of California, San Francisco 2004-2005
    University of California, San Francisco 2004-2005
    Stanford 2004-2005
    Stanford 2004-2005
    University of California, Irvine 2006-2007
    Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale 2006-2007
    University of California, San Francisco 2006-2007
    Massachusetts General Hospital 2008-2009

     

  • Musculoskeletal
    University of California, San Diego 1996-1997
    University of California, San Diego 2004-2005

     

  • Neuroradiology
    Stanford University 1997-1998
    Barrow Neurologic Institute 1997-1999
    University of Utah 2001-2003
    University of Southern California 2006-2007
    University of Pennsylvania 2007-2008

     

  • Thoracic
    UCLA 1996-1997
    University of California, San Francisco 2000-2001

     

  • Vascular and Interventional Radiology
    Oregon Health Science University 1996-1997
    Oregon Health Science University 1997-1998
    Medical College of Wisconsin 1997-1998
    Medical College of Wisconsin 1998-1999
    Baylor (Dallas) 2000-2001
    Thomas Jefferson 2002-2003
    University of California, San Diego 2003-2004
    University of North Carolina 2005-2006
    Massachusetts General Hospital 2006-2007
    University of Pennsylvania 2007-2008
    Baylor (Dallas) 2008-2009
    University of California, San Francisco 2008-2009

     

  • Women's Imaging
    UCLA 1997-1998
    UCLA 1999-2000
    UCLA 1999-2000
    Indiana University 2006-2007
    University of Pennsylvania 2008-2009
  • MRI
    University of California, San Diego 2002-2003